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Authority record

100th Avenue War Service Group

  • Corporate body
  • 1940-1945

The 100th Avenue War Service Group was formed by a group of women in Edmonton, Alberta in 1940. The purpose of the group was to raise funds and make clothing and quilts for the Red Cross Society, which distributed the items to soldiers and to civilians in England and the occupied countries in Europe during World War II.

The group executive was comprised of an honorary president, president, vice president, treasurer, secretary, convenor of the Works Committee, assistant to the convenor of the Works Committee, convenor of the Red Cross Works Committee, assistant to the convenor of the Red Cross Works Committee, and convenor of the Ways and Means Committee. The first executive members were G.I. Poole, D. Radford. W.J. Hale, R.P. Malone, A. Mclean, N.T. Miller, A.C. Emery, J.A. MacArthur, R.A. Munro, and W.B. Pitfield.

It is not known when the group was officially disbanded, but it became inactive after 1945.

19th Alberta Dragoons

  • Corporate body

The 19th Alberta Dragoons had its beginning on 1 December 1905 when three independent squadrons of the Canadian Mounted Rifles were organized in Alberta. These included “A” Squadron at Edmonton, “B” Squadron at Strathcona, and “C” Squadron at Fort Saskatchewan. It thus became one of the earliest militia groups in the province. A fourth squadron was established at St. Albert in 1907 and in the following year the government designated it as a four-squadron regiment named the 19th Alberta Mounted Rifles. The four squadrons then received the title of 19th Alberta Dragoons on 3 January 1911. The 19th Alberta Dragoons and the Alberta Mounted Rifles were amalgamated on 16 February 1936 as the 19th Alberta Dragoons. On 1 April 1946, the 19th Alberta Dragoons and the 101st Regiment Edmonton Fusiliers were amalgamated and designated 19th Alberta Armoured Car Regiment (Edmonton Fusiliers). It was further designated the 19th Alberta Armoured Car Regiment on 4 February 1949, 19th Alberta Dragoons (19th Armoured Car Regiment) on 1 November 1954 and back to 19th Alberta Dragoons on 10 May 1958.

During the First World War the 19th Alberta Dragoons served in France and Flanders. During the Second World War the 19th Alberta Dragoons served in the Reserve Army.

4 Point Trucking Co-operative

  • Corporate body

The 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Limited (Ltd.) was formed in July 1963 in the Andrew, Alberta area. The membership of the association consisted of the Andrew, Lamont, St. Michael, Mundare, and Park co-operative associations.

The purpose of the association was to provide trucking services to and from member co-operatives and any other businesses for the benefit of the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Limited, subject to the approval of the board of directors of the associations concerned. The head office of the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Ltd. was in the offices of the Andrew Co-operative Association, and the manager of the Andrew Co-operative Association was the manager for the 4 Point Trucking Co-operative Ltd.

51st Battalion Association

  • Corporate body

The 51st Battalion Association was formed in September 1919 and was located in Edmonton, Alberta. The association was composed of members of the 51st Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), which was formed circa (ca.) January 4, 1915 and served overseas during World War I. The association organized yearly reunions for the veterans.

A.E. Goodwin was the secretary-treasurer during the years 1951-1970, and A.A. Allbright was president during 1965-1968. It held a sixtieth anniversary reunion at the Montgomery Legion Branch No. 28 in Edmonton in 1975.

Aalborg, Anders

  • Person
  • 1914-2000

Anders Aalborg was born in Oxville, Alberta in 1914. Graduating from Provincial Normal School in Edmonton in 1933, he taught in the Lloydminster area and also served as a school principal. He married Catherine May Burn (1914-2002) in 1939, and together they had two children, John and Roberta Mae.

After an initial unsuccessful campaign in 1945, he was elected as a Social Credit MLA in 1948 in the Alexandra electoral district. He served as Minister of Education (1952-1964), Provincial Treasurer (1964-1971) and Minister of Telephones (1967-1968). He served as Acting Premier between the terms of Ernest Manning and Harry Strom. He retired from politics at the dissolution of the Legislative Assembly in 1971.

He moved to British Columbia in 1972 and died in Surrey, BC, in 2000.

Abasand Oils

  • Corporate body
  • 1930-1975

In 1930, Max W. Ball and associates Basil O. Jones and James McClave established Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products Limited to produce oil and refined products from the oil sands of the Athabasca region near Fort McMurray, Alberta. A charter was issued to Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products by the Federal Government on September 2, 1930; the head office of the company was located in Edmonton, Alberta.

The company developed a process for the extraction of oil from the oil sands. The Canadian Northern Oil-Sand Products was renamed Abasand Oils Limited in 1935. The company built a plant on land leased from the Federal Government on the banks of the Horse River, near Fort McMurray, Alberta; the plant opened in 1936. In 1943, the Federal Government took over operations at the Abasand Oils' plant under the War Measures Act. The plant was damaged by fire in 1945. The federal government abandoned the site in May 1946, and the rights and properties were returned to the Abasand Oils. The plant did not resume operations.

In 1953, Abasand Oils subleased most of its oil sands holdings, but it was not until 1967 that it began to receive royalties. Abasand Oils became a subsidiary of Canadian Industrial Gas and Oil Limited, which dissolved in 1975.

ABC Investment Club

  • Corporate body

The ABC Investment Club was formed on January 26, 1965 in Edmonton, Alberta with seven founding members; Helen Diemert, Bea Grinnell, Alice Dowhaniuk, Pat George, Joyce Lampard, Betty Berry, Mary MacEachern and Glenys Lashmar.

The purposes of the club were to educate members in the fundamental principles and techniques of sound investment practice, and to enable members to invest regularly and mutually to take advantage of compound income. The club was organized with a president, vice-president, managing director and secretary and allowed only fifteen active members.

Abell, Ted

  • Person
  • 1919-1982

Edward (Ted) Howard Abell was born June 22, 1919 in Edmonton, Alberta, but was raised and educated in Calgary, Alberta. He attended the Western Canada High School in Calgary. Following graduation in 1937, he apprenticed at the Palace Bakery in Calgary, becoming a journeyman baker in 1939.

After the Second World War started, Ted joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (R.C.A.F.), training as a pilot and then as a flying instructor. From 1941 to 1943, Ted was a flying instructor, and from 1943 to 1945 he was a flight lieutenant overseas. Following the war, Ted returned to the bakery for two years, and then worked for the City of Calgary for two years. Ted reenlisted with the R.C.A.F., serving in various capacities in Claresholm, Alberta, Comox, British Columbia, Cold Lake, Alberta, Edmonton, Namao, Alberta, Resolute Bay, Northwest Territories and Lancaster Park, Alberta.

After retiring from the R.C.A.F. in June 1964, Ted worked for the Centennial Branch of the Department of the Provincial Secretary from 1964 to 1967 as the Centennial Officer on the Centennial Committee, which helped plan and promote Alberta's celebrations for Canada's 100th Birthday.

He and wife Dorothy had one son, Ted, and six daughters, Ginger, Nancy (O'Hara), Joyce (Andre), Linda (Campbell), Shirley (Senger) and June (Leechuy).

Ted died December 25, 1982.

Aberdeen School District No. 291

  • Corporate body
  • 1893-1958

Aberdeen School District Number (No.) 291 was formed on October 11, 1893 near Innisfail, Alberta. Specifically, it was located at Section 20, Township 35, Range 27, West of the 4th Meridian (20-35-27-W4). The first school board members included Alex McGillivary, W.L. Center, and Egerton Greer. H. A. Malcolm was hired as the first teacher and also fulfilled the duties of secretary-treasurer for the school board. In 1916 the school was moved to Section 29, Township 35, Range 27, West of the 4th Meridian (29-35-27-W4). The school was closed circa (ca.) 1957 and ministerial approval for sale of the school land to the Innisfail community was given ca. 1958.

Aberhart Memorial Sanatorium

  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1970

The Aberhart Memorial Sanatorium opened in 1952 in Edmonton, Alberta. The sanatorium treated tuberculosis patients until 1970 when management of the hospital transferred to the University of Alberta Hospital. The sanatorium offered 295 beds, and a large nurse's residence. Dr. H.H. Stephen was Medical Superintendent of the Sanatorium from 1952 to 1969.

Aberhart, William

  • Person
  • 1878-1943

William ("Bible Bill") Aberhart was born December 30, 1878 near Seaforth, Ontario; he was the son of William and Louisa (Pepper) Aberhart. He studied at Mitchell Model School, Chatham Business College, Seaforth Collegiate Institute and the Ontario Normal School in Hamilton, Ontario. In 1899, he taught at Morris School, near Wingham, Ontario. In 1901, he moved to Brantford, Ontario and taught at Central Public School; he was appointed principal of Central Public School in 1905. He was active in Brantford's Zion Presbyterian Church and for a time planned on entering the Presbyterian ministry. He married Janet "Jessie" Flatt (1878-1964) on July 29, 1902; they had two daughters, Khona Louise (Cooper) (1903-1998) and Ola Janette (MacNutt) (1905-2000). He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Queen's University in 1911; he accomplished this by correspondence beginning in 1907.

The Aberhart family moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1910, as Aberhart had accepted an offer from the Calgary School Board to become principal of Mount Royal College beginning in the spring of 1910. However, the school was not ready when he arrived so he became principal of Alexandra Public School. In the fall of 1910, with Mount Royal still not ready, he became principal of Victoria School. When ready, he did become principal of Mount Royal School and then in 1913 became the principal of King Edward School. From 1915 to 1935, Aberhart was principal of Crescent Heights High School.

He taught bible classes at Trinity Methodist Church until 1916 and attended and taught classes at Grace Presbyterian Church until 1912. The Aberhart family then attended Wesley Methodist Church and Westbourne Baptist Church where Aberhart was eventually recognized as a lay minister and baptized on May 2, 1920. By 1918, Aberhart's bible classes we so popular and well attended, the classes were renamed the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference. In 1925, he was appointed Dean of the newly established Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute. Also beginning in 1925, Aberhart's Sunday afternoon bible lectures for the Calgary Prophetic Bible Conference were broadcast over the radio; these became known as "Back-to-the-Bible Hour." In 1929, Aberhart established the Bible Institute Baptist Church.

Beginning in 1932, influenced by personal experiences brought on by the Depression, Aberhart began to give serious thought and study to the social credit theories espoused by Major C.H. Douglas. In 1933, Aberhart began giving lectures on these theories, soon forming a Social Credit Study Group; other study groups formed across Calgary and the province. Aberhart organized the Douglas Social Credit League in 1933 (later the Alberta Social Credit League).

Initially trying to work with United Farmers of Alberta to implement social credit theories, when this failed, Aberhart organized the social credit movement into a political party, and this Alberta Social Credit Party won the majority of seat in the 1935 provincial election. As leader of the Social Credit Party, even though he did not run, Aberhart was sworn in as Premier and Minister of Education on September 3; on November 3, 1935, a by-election was held in the electoral district of Okotoks-High River which Aberhart won by acclamation. On September 5, 1937, he was appointed Attorney General. He was reelected in 1940 for electoral district of Calgary.

Suffering from illness, Aberhart and his wife traveled to Vancouver, British Columbia in April of 1943 to visit their daughters. William Aberhart died May 23, 1943 and was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Academic Books (Vancouver)

  • Corporate body

Academic Books was an antique buyer and seller of books, manuscripts, and antique maps, located in Vancouver, BC. They discussed aiming to keep historical Canadian records within Canada and sell records to Canadian archives and museums, when financially feasible to do so.

ACCESS TV

  • Corporate body

ACCESS TV was the designated educational broadcaster in Alberta. ACCESS produced, broadcasted and distributed television-based multimedia learning programs to learners of all ages, in partnership with Alberta departments of education, educational institutions and educators. Many of the programs, including all of the dramas, were connected to and promoted formal courses of study offered by the province's universities and colleges or the formal learning objectives of Alberta Education and Advanced Education.

In December 1972, an announcement was made that the Alberta government would set up an Alberta Educational Communications Corporation (AECC). CKUA's radio license would be transferred from the University of Alberta to the Corporation, which would also take over two local educational television experimental projects that had been established earlier, MEETA (Metropolitan Edmonton Educational Television Association) and CARET (Calgary and Regional Educational Television Association).

On 30 June 1973, AECC, operating as ACCESS Alberta, was established as an independent statutory corporation with its own Board of Directors appointed by the Lieutenant Governor-in-Council.

On 9 January 1984, AECC was granted a broadcast license from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) for a television station. On 13 January 1985, the ACCESS Network began a twelve-hour-per-day service of both formal and informal educational programming delivered via satellite to cable companies throughout the province. The hours-per-day and the distribution expanded when two VHF transmitters were added, one in Edmonton and one in Calgary, to reach those households that did not have cable.

In 1993, the Government of Alberta undertook a re-evaluation of all provincially-funded activities and announced that it would not provide direct funding for ACCESS beyond 1994. At this point, ACCESS entered an agreement to sell the CKUA radio network to the not-for-profit CKUA Radio Foundation.

In 1995, ACCESS was privatized and sold to Learning and Skills Television of Alberta Limited (LTA), 60% of which was owned by CHUM Limited. Following a public hearing in April 1995, LTA was granted a full CRTC seven year broadcast license and introduced the new ACCESS television on 1 September 1995.

In February 2005, CHUM Limited acquired the remaining 40% interest in LTA, giving the company 100% of its shares including ACCESS. At that time, LTA began operating under the trade name “access media group.”

On 12 July 2006, CTVglobemedia Ltd. announced that it would make a friendly takeover bid to buy CHUM Limited, including ACCESS. This was finalized on 22 June 2007.

A new three-year agreement between LTA and Alberta Education and Advanced Education was signed on 1 April 2008. Under the agreement, ACCESS continued to broadcast and distribute programming for Alberta Education and Advanced Education.

On 29 August 2011, Access was relaunched by CTVglobemedia as CTV Two Alberta. CTV Two is mandated to “combine the best in entertainment programming in the evenings with a daytime broadcast schedule dedicated to commercial-free kid's programming and series designed to support K-12 and Post-Secondary courses of study.”

ACFA régionale de Bonnyville/Cold Lake

  • Corporate body

Les associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'association de Bonnyville/Cold Lake fut incorporée au niveau provincial en 1977.

ACFA régionale de Calgary

  • Corporate body

Les associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. Avant d'être incorporée en 1983, l'ACFA régionale de Calgary eut comme prédécesseurs la Société franco-canadienne de Calgary et, à partir de 1971, le Conseil régionale ACFA de Calgary.

ACFA régionale de Calgary/Banff

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous regional organizations based on parish associations.

ACFA régionale de Centralta

  • Corporate body

L'Association Centralta de ACFA fut initialement un comité social culturel francophone, dont la première réunion eut lieu en janvier 1975 chez Mme Simone Chauvet à Legal. Germain Fortier fut élu président, Simone Chauvet, vice-présidente et Marthe Hériveau, secrétaire-trésorière. Le but de l'association fut d'organiser, coordonner et développer des activités sociales et culturelles pour les francophones dans les communautés de Morrinville, Legal et Vimy. La nouvelle association fut incorporée sous le nom d'ACFA en 1977.

ACFA régionale de Centralta

  • Corporate body

The Centralta association of the ACFA was created in 1975 at the house of Madame Simone Chauvet in Legal. Originally created to serve the communities of Morinville, Legal and Vimy, the association was intended to organize, coordinate and develop cultural and social activities for francophones in the region. The new association was incorporated under the ACFA's name in 1977 in order to secure better funding from Provincial and Federal granting agencies. Since then, the association has worked to provide better access to cultural activities and services for the local French community.

ACFA régionale de Grande Prairie

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association.

ACFA régionale de Grande Prairie

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'ACFA régionale de Grande Prairie, précédée par le Cercle régional de Grande Prairie, obtint son incorporation légale en janvier 2000.

ACFA régionale de Jasper

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'ACFA régionale de Jasper obtint son incorporation légale en 2005.

ACFA regionale de Jasper

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association.

ACFA régionale de Lethbridge/Medicine Hat

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'ACFA régionale de Lethbridge / Medicine Hat obtint son incorporation légale en 1978.

ACFA régionale de Plamondon/Lac-la-Biche

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'association régionale de Plamondon/Lac-la-Biche fut incorporée en 1979.

ACFA régionale de Red Deer

  • Corporate body

Les premières associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones.

Le Cercle local de l'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta, région de Red Deer fut incorporé le 28 mai 1999 sous la charte attribuée à l'ACFA provinciale. Le Cercle cherchait à représenter et à regrouper tous les francophones résidents sur le territoire de Red Deer et de la région. En novembre 2004 l'Assemblée générale annuelle du cercle a adopté le changement de statut et de nom en l'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta, Régionale de Red Deer.

ACFA régionale de Red Deer

  • Corporate body

The first regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organization based on parish association. The Cercle local de l'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta, région de Red Deer was incorporated on May 28, 1999, under the chart of the provincial ACFA. The Cercle aimed to represent and regroup all the Francophones residing in Red Deer and region. In November 2004, the annual general assembly voted for the change of name and status as Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta, Régionale de Red Deer.

ACFA Régionale de Rivière-la-Paix

  • Corporate body

ACFA's first Regional Cultural Committee in Peace River started its activities in 1973-1974. The regional association of Rivière-la-Paix was incorporated under ACFA's provincial statute on July 28, 1977.

The regional branch of ACFA offers social and cultural activities to the Francopones of the region, including entertainment shows in French and family-oriented activities; it also works closely with providers of daycare, health and cultural services. The association looks to amplify the Francophone presence in various regional initiatives and to emphasize sustainable projects and activities focused on family and youth that will guarantee the community development in the long term. Through its community FM station, CKRP Radio Rivière-la-Paix, the regional ACFA is able to ensure better communication with its partners and to provide support to other Francophone associations and committees.

Having its headquarters in Falher, the association serves a wide territory including municipalities like Peace River, St. Isidore, Marie-Reine, Jean-Côté, Donnelly, Girouxville, McLennan and Tangent. Together, the region hosts about 5000 Francophones and more than 3000 Francophiles. The regional ACFA manages an employment resource centre, a community radio station, and the Community Access Program (CAP/PAC).

ACFA régionale de Rivière-la-Paix

  • Corporate body

Le premier Comité culturel régional de l'ACFA à Rivière-la-Paix fut formé en 1973-1974. L'ACFA régionale de Rivière-la-Paix a été incorporée le 28 juillet 1977 sous la Charte attribuée à l'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta (ACFA).

ACFA Rivière-la-Paix offre des activités sociales et culturelles aux francophones de sa région, telles que des spectacles en français et des activités orientées vers la famille, et assure une collaboration continue avec les différents secteurs tels que la petite enfance, la santé et la culture. L'organisme cherche aussi à accroître la présence francophone dans les divers regroupements de la région et à mettre l'accent sur la réalisation d'activités et de projets durables, axés sur la famille et la jeunesse, pour assurer le développement à long terme de la communauté. Par l'entremise de la radio communautaire CKRP-FM, l'ACFA régionale a le moyen d'assurer une meilleure communication entre ses divers partenaires et poursuit son appui aux associations francophones et comités existants.

Située dans la ville de Falher, l'ACFA régionale rend service à un vaste territoire qui comprend, outre Falher, de nombreuses municipalités francophones et francophiles dont Peace River, Saint-Isidore, Marie-Reine, Jean-Côté, Donnelly, Girouxville, McLennan, et Tangent. Ensemble, les régions comportent un bassin de plus ou moins 5000 francophones et plus de 3000 francophiles. ACFA régionale gère un centre de ressource à l'emploi, une radio communautaire (lancée en octobre 1996), et le Programme d'accès communautaire (PAC).

ACFA Régionale de Saint-Paul

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association. The regional association of Saint-Paul was incorporated under provincial statute in 1973.

ACFA régionale de Saint-Paul

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'association de Saint-Paul obtint son incorporation légale en 1973.

ACFA régionale de Wood Buffalo

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'association de Wood Buffalo obtint son incorporation légale en 1980.

ACFA régionale de Wood Buffalo

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association. The regional association of Wood Buffalo was incorporated under provincial statute in 1980.

ACFA régionale d'Edmonton

  • Corporate body

Les associations régionales de l'ACFA, incluant la régionale d'Edmonton, furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. L'ACFA régionale d'Edmonton, précédée par le Cercle régional d'Edmonton d'ACFA, obtint son incorporation légale le 28 juillet 1977.

ACFA régionale d'Edmonton

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association.

ACFA régionale, Provisoires et général

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association. Provisional associations are created before they are incorporated under provincial statute as full regional associations.

ACFA régionale, Provisoires et général

  • Corporate body

Des associations régionales de l'ACFA furent formées en 1961, ayant à l'origine l'organisation régionale des paroisses francophones. Les associations provisoires sont crées avant leur incorporation sous statut provincial comme associations régionales.

ACFA régionales de Bonnyville/Cold Lake

  • Corporate body

The regional associations of the ACFA were formed in 1961, consolidating the previous organizations based on parish association. The Bonnyville/Cold Lake branch was officially incorporated under Provincial statute in 1977.

Acme United Church (1909-1998)

  • Corporate body

Acme United Church in Acme, Alberta has its origins in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Acme and Acme Methodist Church. Presbyterian services were first held in Acme in 1909 in the Kiaora School. A church building was completed on August 7, 1910 and the congregation took the name of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. As the community grew, the church building was used as a school and worship was moved to the Methodist Church building. Formal unification talks began between the Presbyterian and Methodist congregations in 1914. Methodist services were first held in Acme at the Delft and Bancroft school-houses by a minister from Carstairs. In 1910 a formal congregation was established and of September 4th of the same year the church building was dedicated, with the congregation being part of the Acme Methodist Circuit. In July 1916 the Presbyterian and Methodist congregations in Acme agreed to unite into a single congregation, the Acme United Church. The Presbyterian Church building was sold and services continued in the previous Methodist Church, the site of the current Acme United Church. Acme United Church voted to join the newly formed United Church of Canada, a union of Methodist, Congregational, and some Presbyterian denominations, in 1925. In 1928, Acme Pastoral Charge was moved from the Calgary Presbytery to the newly formed Three Hills Presbytery. In 1938, the church building was renovated. In 1957 the old church was moved to a new site so that a new church building could be constructed. The new building was dedicated on Sunday Dec. 22, 1957. In 1998, Acme United Church amalgamated with Zion United Church in Beiseker, and the name Acme United Church was retained.

Acme United Church (1998-)

  • Corporate body

In 1998, Acme United Church (1909-1998) in Acme, Alberta amalgamated with Zion United Church in Beiseker, Alberta under the name Acme United Church. Services continue to be held in the previous church building of Acme United Church. It is part of the Acme Pastoral Charge and located in the Foothills Presbytery.

Acorn, Ted

  • Person
  • 1928-1992

Born in 1928, Fredrick Gerald "Ted" Acorn was a musician from Claresholm, Alberta. He married Anne, and together they had eight children: Colleen (Gaab), Jackie (1955-1973), Phyllis (Wright), Michael, Sandi (Stapleford), Debbie, Robin, and Jodi . He died in Claresholm in 1992.

Acton, J. A.

  • Person

J.A. Acton was from Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, England.

Acute and Long Term Care

  • Corporate body

The function of the Acute and Long Term Care Division was to provide global funding to 124 acute care hospitals and 137 long term care facilities, and to plan, develop, and fund programs delivered by hospitals, long-term care facilities, and emergency health services. Established in 1992 from a predecessor body, it was replaced in 1994 in a major departmental reorganization resulting from a major shift in governmental philosophy regarding the delivery of health care to Albertans. The Division during its short life was responsible to administer a number of acts and regulations, the most significant of which was the Hospitals Act. Divisional predecessors were known as: Hospitals Branch (1922-1927); Hospitals, Charity and Relief Branch (1927-1930); Hospitals Division (1930-1946); Hospital and Medical Services Division (1947-1956), Hospitals Division (1956-67), Hospital Services Section (1967-1971), Hospital Services Commission (1971-1978), Hospital Planning and Operations Division (1979), and lastly, the Hospital Services Division (1979-1992). In its final year of operation (1993) the Acute and Long Term Care Division was composed of four main branches: Hospital Services Branch, Long Term Care Branch, Specialty Services Branch, and Emergency Health Services Branch.

Adair, Al

  • Person
  • 1929-1996

James Allen "Al" Adair was born in Edmonton in 1929. He moved to Peace River in 1953 to work as a seed dealer, later working for a catering firm and then at radio station CKYL as an announcer and an executive. He was involved in many community organizations, including baseball and hockey associations. He received the nickname "Boomer" either for his distinctive on-air radio voice or his ability to score runs in baseball. He married Joyce Johnson (1935-2019) in 1960, and together they had three children: Rick, Rob, and Cathy (Grose).

He was elected as a Progressive Conservative MLA in 1971 for the Peace River electoral district. He served as a Minister without Portfolio with responsibility for northern development and indigenous issues (1971-1975), Minister of Recreation, Parks and Wildlife (1975-1979), Minister of Tourism and Small Business (1979-1985), Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs (1985-1986), and Minister of Transportation and Utilities (1986-1992). He retired from provincial politics at the dissolution of the Legislative Assembly in 1993.

After he retired, he co-authored a memoir about his political career, "Boomer: My Life with Peter, Don and Ralph," published in 1994.

He died in Peace River in 1996.

Adams, Clifford J.

  • Person
  • 1883-1954

Clifford (Cliff) James Adams was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England on October 19, 1883. He immigrated to Edmonton, Alberta in 1914 with his wife Esther (Hetty) (née Evans) (1885-1954) and son David Clifford (1912-2002); Cliff's brother, Reginald Adams, who had come to Edmonton years earlier, had encouraged Cliff to come out.

Cliff was a bookkeeper by trade, and worked as an office manager for the Edmonton Stock Yards and was subsequently an employee of the Canadian National Railway. Cliff was also for a time the secretary-treasurer of the Heart Stooker Company Limited. Cliff was active in St. Michael and All Angels Anglican church, serving as secretary-treasurer for many years. He was also secretary-treasurer for the North Edmonton Public School Parents' Teachers' Association.

Predeceased by his wife in January, Cliff died March 28, 1954.

Adams, Fred

  • Person

Fred Adams lived in North Battleford, Saskatchewan during the 1940s. He later moved to Edmonton and worked as Caretaker Superintendent for the Provincial Museum and Archives of Alberta.

Adams, Martha Lena

  • Person
  • 1899-1981

Born in 1899, Martha Lena Zielinski was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Zielinski, who lived in Edmonton, Alberta. Martha graduated from the Royal Alexandra School of Nursing in 1925. She was a nurse in Edmonton, Alberta for many years.

In about 1947 or 1948, she married Thomas Adams. Martha died in November 1981.

Adams, Randall

  • Person
  • 1951-2015

Randall (Randy) Adams was born on 27 September 1951 in Edmonton, AB. Adams was a photographer whose work has been exhibited at galleries such as the Edmonton Art Gallery, the Glenbow Museum, and the South Okanagan Art Gallery in Penticton, BC. His work is also part of the permanent collections of the Alberta Foundation for the Arts and the Art Gallery of Alberta.

Randall Adams died on 25 April 2015 in Nanaimo, BC.

Adamson, Laurence

  • Person
  • 1868-1945

Born in Cape Town, South Africa in 1868, Laurence Adamson was an officer in the Strathcona squadron of the Canadian Mounted Rifles, and fought as part of the Boer War. He lived in the Fort Saskatchewan, North-West Territories area, and was appointed Justice of the Peace in and for the North-West Territories in 1897.

A Lieutenant in 1908, Adamson attended the Provincial School of Cavalry in Edmonton, Alberta. After moving to Sidney, British Columbia, Laurence Adamson gave his farm, which consisted of the better part of a quarter section in the Ardrossan/Clover Bar area, to the Patriotic Fund of Northern Alberta.

He was married to Nellie Alanson (1878-1958) in 1903, and together they had ? children: Laurence (1904-1975), James (1905-1952), Mary (1906-1993), and Amy (1909-1984). He died in Victoria in 1945.

Adel, George

  • Person
  • 1906-1958

George Adel was born in Russia in 1906 and came to Canada with his parents in 1910. They initially settled in Rosthern, Saskatchewan but came to Medicine Hat, Alberta in 1915.

He worked at Medalta Potteries from the mid-1920s until the business closed in 1957.

He married Mary Paul (1905-1990) in Medicine Hat in 1926, and together they had four children: Betty Ann (Crocket), George (1927-1982), Kenneth (1933-2014) and Richard (1939-1990). He died in Medicine Hat in 1958.

Advanced Education

  • Corporate body

Dates of founding and/or dissolution:
The Department of Advanced Education was first founded in September 1971 through the passage of Order in Council 1614/71 under the Public Service Administrative Transfers Act, 1971, which transferred administration of the Colleges Act and the Universities Act to the Minister of Advanced Education. Formal creation of the department occurred on June 2, 1972 with the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Act. The department was dissolved in 1975 through the passage of the Department of Advanced Education Amendment Act.
In 1983, the Department of Advanced Education was recreated through the enactment and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Act , 1983. The department was dissolved again in December 1992, when its responsibilities were transferred through Order in Council 749/92 to the new Department of Advanced Education and Career Development.
In 2004, the Department of Advanced Education was founded by means of Order in Council 552/2004 under the Authority of the Government Organization Act (R.S.A., Chapter G-10, 2000). The department was dissolved again on December 15, 2006 and its responsibilities were transferred through Order in Council 636/2006 to the new Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology.

Functional responsibility:
The principal functional responsibilities of the department were the planning, administration, and operation of the entire post-secondary education system in Alberta, including programs delivered through universities, colleges, and technical, agricultural and vocational institutions. The Minister was responsible for the administration of the following acts and their regulations: 19. Alberta Centennial Education Savings Plan Act

  1. Alberta Heritage Scholarship Act
  2. Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act
  3. Banff Centre Act
  4. Colleges Act
  5. Department of Advanced Education Act
  6. Education of Service Men's Children's Act
  7. Post-secondary Learning Act (except sections 66(2) and (3), 67, 72(3) and (4), 73, 80 and 99(1)(a) and (2) to (6))
  8. Private Vocational Schools Act
  9. Students Loan Guarantee Act
  10. Students Finance Act
  11. Student Financial Assistance Act
  12. Technical Institutes Act
  13. Trade Schools Regulation Act
  14. Universities Act
  15. Universities Foundations Act

Predecessor and successor bodies:
Before the creation of the Department of Advanced Education, responsibility for delivery of adult agricultural and vocational education was held by the Department of Agriculture, by way of the Agricultural and Vocational Colleges Act , 1967. Responsibility for adult education delivered through universities, colleges, and technical institutes was held by the Department of Education, through the Department of Education Act.
In 1975, responsibility for planning, administration and operation of the post-secondary education system was transferred to the new Department of Advanced Education and Manpower, through administrative transfers formalized through Orders in Council 0140/83 and 0285/83.
In 1983, post-secondary education and manpower functions were split into two departments again, through the recreation of the Department of Advanced Education and the creation of the Department of Manpower.
In December 1992, responsibility for the post-secondary education system in Alberta was transferred to the new Department of Advanced Education and Career Development through administrative transfers formalized through Order in Council 749/92. The Department was dissolved in 1999 and its functions were divided between Alberta Learning and Alberta Human Resources and Employment.
In November 2004, responsibility for the post-secondary education system was transferred to the Department of Advanced Education from the former Ministry of Learning. The Department of Advanced Education was succeeded in 2006 by the Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology.

Administrative relationships:
The Department of Advanced Education reported to the Legislative Assembly through the Minister of Advanced Education. The Minister also passed to the Legislative Assembly the annual reports of semi-independent agencies that reported to him:

  1. Universities Commission (1972-1973)
  2. Colleges Commission (1972-1973)
  3. Students' Finance Board (1972-1975, 1986-1992, 2004-2006)
  4. Private Vocational Schools Advisory Council (1983-1992, 2004-2006)
  5. Private Colleges Accreditation Board (1984-1992)
  6. University of Calgary Foundation (1991-1992)
  7. University of Alberta 1991 Foundation (1991-1992)
  8. University of Lethbridge Foundation (1991-1992)
  9. Athabasca University Foundation (1991-1992)
  10. Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board (2004-2006)
  11. Campus Alberta Quality Council (2004-2006)

Administrative structure:
The structure of the department when it was first formed was hierarchical. The principal components of the department were various divisions, each in turn made up of a number of branches. Three semi-independent agencies, the Students' Finance Board, the Universities Commission and the Colleges Commission, reported directly to the Minister of Advanced Education. The Communications and Personnel offices reported directly to the Deputy Minister. Provincially Administered Institutions functioned as divisions of the Department. Their presidents reported directly to the Deputy Minister, who acted in the role of Board of Directors for these institutions. Provincially Administered Institutions included the Alberta Vocational Centres (former agricultural colleges) and, until April 1982, Alberta's three Technical Institutes. In 1982, the three Technical Institutes became Board-governed institutions akin to public colleges and universities. Significant reorganizations of the Department took place in 1973, 1985, 1986, and 1988.
In the first two years of the department, the different divisions were Continuing Education, Regional Colleges (agricultural colleges), Vocational Education, and Other Services. These divisions had been transferred from predecessor agencies when the department was created, and were all eliminated with the first departmental reorganization in 1973. With reorganization, the department's divisions reflected general departmental functions, such as administration, planning, program delivery, and policy development. The principal functions of the department were performed by the following units:

  1. Administration and support functions: performed by the Other Services Division (1972-1975), Administrative Services Division (1973-1975 and 1983-1988), and Department Services Division (1988-1992)

  2. System planning: Special Services Division (1973-1975) and Planning, Research and Organizational Analysis Division (1985-1986)

  3. Program planning, development, coordination and delivery, and development of campus facilities: Program Services Division (1973-1975 and1983-1988), Field Services Division (1983-1988), and Operations Division (1988-1992)

  4. Administration of Provincially Administered Institutions: Division of Vocational Education (1972-1973), Regional Colleges Division (1972-1973), Provincially Administered Institutions Services Branch (1973-1975), Financial Planning Branch (1973-1975, 1983-1986), Operations and Planning Branch (1986-1988), Operating and Endowment Support Branch (1988-1992)

  5. Policy development and evaluation of programs to ensure that they conform to provincial and departmental policies: Policy and Planning Division (1988-1992)

  6. Student support: Special Services Division (1973-1975)
    When the Department was recreated in 2004, the principal components of the Department were as follows:

  7. Adult Learning Division: responsible for working with adult learners, public and private post-secondary institutions, and community adult learning councils to support learners, provide learning opportunities and enhance the adult learning system

  8. Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: responsible for working with industry, employer and employee organizations, technical training providers, government and ministry divisions to support the development, maintenance and delivery of designated trade and occupation programs

  9. Strategic Corporate Services Division: responsible for providing strategic, legal, system-wide planning, financial, information management and technology, international education, intergovernmental issues and policy management, and human resource services for the Ministry

  10. Communications: responsible for working with the ministry and stakeholders to provide communications support related to ministry work.

Names of chief officers:
Ministers of Advanced Education:
James L. Foster 1972-1975
Dick Johnston 1983-1986
David J. Russell 1986-1989
John Gogo 1989-1992
Jack W. Ady 1992
David Hancock 2004-2006
Denis Herard 2006

Advanced Education and Manpower

  • Corporate body

Dates of founding and/or dissolution:
The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was created in 1975 by means of Order in Council 0514/75 under the authority of the Public Service Administrative Transfers Act. Creation of the department was formalized by the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Amendment Act that same year. This Act created a new government Department by merging the Department of Advanced Education with the Manpower Division of the previous Department of Manpower and Labour.

The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was effectively dissolved in November 1982 through the appointment of a Minister of Advanced Education and a Minister of Manpower (renamed Career Development and Employment in 1986). Transfer to those Ministers of program responsibilities, budget appropriations, and certain positions occurred effective March 31, 1983. The creation of the two departments was formalized in 1983 through the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Act and the Department of Manpower Act, formally dissolving the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower.

Functional responsibility:
The department had two principal functional responsibilities: - the planning, administration, and operation of the post-secondary educational system in Alberta, including programs delivered through universities, colleges, technical and vocational institutions, and

  • the planning, development and implementation of programs designed to meet the present and anticipated future manpower needs of the province.

The department was responsible for the administration of the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower Act, Colleges Act, Universities Act, Banff Centre Act, Trade Schools Regulation Act, Private Vocational Schools Act, Education of Service Men's Children's Act, Private Vocational Schools Act, Students Loan Guarantee Act, Students Finance Act, Alberta Heritage Scholarship Act, Apprenticeship Act and Manpower Development Act and all regulations under these acts.

Predecessor and successor bodies:
The predecessors of the Department of Advanced Education and Manpower were the Department of Advanced Education (all advanced education functions and activities) and the Manpower Division of the Department of Manpower and Labour (all manpower development functions and activities).

The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was succeeded in 1983 by two departments, the recreated Department of Advanced Education and the Department of Manpower.

Administrative relationships:
The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower reported to the Legislative Assembly through the Minister of Advanced Education and Manpower. The Minister also passed to the Legislative Assembly the annual reports of four semi-independent agencies which reported to him, the Students' Finance Board, the Manpower Advisory Council (1976-83), the Alberta Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Board, and the Private Vocational Schools Advisory Council (1979-83).

Administrative Structure:
The structure of the department was hierarchical. The principal components of the Department were the various divisions listed below, each in turn made up of a number of branches. As well, a number of semi-independent agencies reported directly to the Minister of Advanced Education and Manpower and some offices with purely administrative functions reported directly to the Deputy Minister. Provincially Administered Institutions functioned as divisions of the department, with their presidents reporting directly to the Deputy Minister, who acted in the role of Board of Directors for these institutions. Provincially Administered Institutions included Alberta Vocational Centres and, until April 1982, Alberta's three Technical Institutes. At this time, the three Technical Institutes became Board-governed institutions akin to public colleges and universities.

The principal functions of the department were performed by the following units:- administration and support functions: Administrative Services Division

  • long-term planning: various branches in the Program Services Division and the Planning Secretariat
  • post-secondary program planning, development, co-ordination, and delivery, and development of campus facilities: Program Services Division and Field Services Division
  • policy development: various branches in the Manpower Services Division, Program Services Division, and the Planning Secretariat
  • student support: Special Services Division (1975)
  • manpower development: Manpower Services Division

Names of chief officers:
Ministers of Advanced Education and Manpower:
A.E. (Bert) Hohol 1975-1979
James D. Horsman 1979-1982
Dick Johnson (Minister of Advanced Education) and Ernie Isley (Minister of Manpower) joint responsibility November 1982-April 1983

Air Cadet League of Canada

  • Corporate body

The Air Cadet League of Canada was founded on November 11, 1940, by the passage of Order-in-Council PC 6647. The organization was formed in response to the shortage of trained military personnel at the beginning of the Second World War. A Civilian organization, working in a partnership with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), they provided flight and other training for underage individuals prior to their eligibility for military service. The Air Cadet League of Canada was granted a Dominion Charter to operate as a charitable, non-profit corporation on April 9, 1941.

Airdrie Chinook Winds Ball Park Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1994-2006

The Airdrie Chinook Winds Ball Park Association (ACWBPA) was a not-for-profit association that raised money to build a baseball park in Airdrie, Alberta.

The ACWBPA was formed in 1994 and became incorporated on 15 June 1995 under the Alberta Societies Act. The objective of the association was to construct four class “A” tournament ball diamonds on a portion of the land acquired for recreation facility development by the Airdrie & District Agricultural Society in 1994.

The ACWBPA was a volunteer-run group, with a president, treasurer and eight board members at their incorporation in 1995. Later years saw the association's board diminish to three to four active members. The association's first president was Paul Bailey, who stepped down from the role in February 1997 to be replaced by Dennis Driscoll, a local real estate agent.

The initial vision for the ball park was to be a site for adult ball players in the community. At the time of the ACWBPA's formation, Airdrie had one dedicated ball park, Fletcher's Field. Association members felt that adults in the community deserved a designated space to play ball, and that youth in the community would benefit from having exclusive access to the existing fields in Airdrie.

The construction of the ball diamonds was approved by the City of Airdrie in 1996 after the City received an infrastructure grant from both the federal and provincial governments to develop recreational facilities on a 1/3 cost sharing basis (1/3 federal monies, 1/3 provincial money and 1/3 municipal money). This municipal 1/3 (approximately $158 000) was to be provided by a user group, the ACWBPA. The ACWBPA agreed to participate, and received a loan from the City of Airdrie for the municipal government portion of the grant. The ACWBPA committed to a five-year repayment plan to the City.

Money to repay the loan would come from four primary sources: grants from the Alberta Community Lottery Board, received between 1998 and 2002, income from the Association's charitable gaming license, team membership registration fees, and general fundraising through dances and community advertising rentals on the fields.

The Chinook Winds Ball Park playing fields were opened in May 1999. The concession and washroom facilities for the park were completed in 2002. The ACWBPA closed their accounts with the Royal Bank in 2006, donating the remaining funds to nonprofits in the Airdrie community.

Airworks Media

  • Corporate body

Airworks was a well-known commercial studio in the Edmonton area. It was known previously as Machine Shop Studio, Goede Studio and Goede Creative, and was in operation from 1974 to 1994. Its clients included a wide range of businesses and non-profit organizations who were provided with commercials, audio-visual promotional material and audio-visual training programs. Clients included those such as Travel Alberta, Alberta Motor Association, Edmonton Law Enforcement Games, Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, Trans-Alta Utilities, Kentucky Fried Chicken and Louie's Submarines.

Albany Avenue Methodist Church

  • Corporate body

Albany Avenue Methodist Church was established in 1912 in the area of 110 Avenue and 128 Street in Edmonton. In 1925 the congregation joined the United Church of Canada, a union of Methodist, Presbyterian, and Congregational denominations and it was re-constituted as Westmount United Church. It was re-named Westminster United Church in 1956. Westminster United Church amalgamated with Kirk United Church in April, 1991.

Albers family

  • Family

The Albers family in the Wetaskiwin area belongs to the Swedish ethnic group called Svenskbybo-people (meaning the “Swedish Village People”). Several members of this same ancestral group settled in central-eastern Alberta in the early 1900s and joined the Lutheran Church of the Augustana Synod. The Svenskbybo-people left Sweden around 1300 for the island of Dago, in the Baltic Sea, where they lived as farmers and fishers for about 500 years. The island was under Swedish ownership from 1563 to 1710. The Russians conquered Dago in 1710 and about in 1781 the Russian authorities forced the Svenskbybo-people to wander through Russia and to settle in a place called Gammalsvenskby (meaning “Old Swedish Village”) in Ukraine, near the Black Sea. It was a five month journey of more than 2,000 kilometres which took place in winter. Only about 500 out of the 1,200 people who started out from Dago survived this long trip. Primitive living facilities and diseases decimated even more the Svenskbybo-people who by 1795 were only 135 persons remaining in the village according to a church register. However after a few decades of tough life as settlers in a new land, during the 1820s the population of Gammalsvenskby grew and life became more comfortable for the Svenskbybo-people who learned new methods of agriculture from their German neighbours. At the end of the 19th century the Svenskbybo-people started to look for additional land and several families decided to come to Canada. The first Svenskbybo-people settled in British Columbia in 1888 and soon after other families came to Alberta which was called Nya Sverige or New Sweden. The immigration to Canada, where land was available, was ongoing for 25 years. Most Svenskbybo-people worked on farms and managed to maintain their culture for a few decades. The Albers family genealogy shows the transition from Swedish culture to Canadian culture and also the historical link between Gammalsvenskby in Russia and Swedish communities in Alberta.

Alberta. Executive Council. Agent-General (London)

  • Corporate body
  • 1927-1933

In 1927, Premier John Brownlee appointed former premier Herbert Greenfield as Alberta's Agent-General in London. The position involved the promotion of emigration to Alberta as well as the expansion of trade and business opportunities. After Greenfield resigned in 1931, his private secretary Hugh Baker continued as the acting Agent-General until the office was officially closed in 1933.

Alberta 75th Anniversary Commission

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-1981

Although Robert W. (Bob) Dowling had been appointed Commissioner by Order in Council (O.C.) 400/79 on May 2, 1979, the Executive Council formally established the mandate and terms of reference for the Alberta 75th Anniversary Commission on July 10, 1979. The Commission disbanded on March 31, 1981.

Alberta. Advanced Education (1971-1975). Minister

  • Corporate body
  • 1971-1975

The Department of Advanced Education was founded in September 1971 by Order in Council 1614/1971 under the Public Service Administrative Transfers Act, 1971. This order transferred administration of the Colleges Act and the Universities Act to the Minister of Advanced Education. Formal creation of the department occurred on June 2, 1972 by the Department of Advanced Education Act (S.A. 1972, c. 28). The passage of the Department of Advanced Education Amendment Act dissolved the department on June 25, 1975 (S.A.1975, c. 7).

Alberta. Advanced Education (1983-1992). Minister

  • Corporate body
  • 1983-1992

The Department of Advanced Education was created in 1983 through the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Act (S.A. 1983, c. D–11.1). Its name was changed to the Department of Advanced Education and Career Development in 1992.

Alberta. Advanced Education (2004-2006). Minister

  • Corporate body
  • 2004-2006

The Department of Advanced Education was established on November 25, 2004 by Order in Council 553/2004 under the authority of the Government Organization Act (R.S.A. 2000, c. G–10). It dissolved in 2006.

Alberta. Advanced Education and Career Development. Minister

  • Corporate body
  • 1992-1999

The Department of Advanced Education and Career Development was established on December 12, 1992 by Order in Council 749/1992, under the authority of the Public Service Administrative Transfers Act. This Order in Council transferred advanced education and manpower development functions to the new Minister of Advanced Education and Career
Development. The creation of the ministry was formalized by Order in Council 785/1994 which reestablished government departments under the new Government Organization Act.
Under the authority of the Government Organization Act, Order in Council 243/1999 dissolved the Department of Advanced Education and Career Development on May 28, 1999.

Alberta. Advanced Education and Manpower. Minister

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-1983

The Department of Advanced Education and Manpower was established in 1975 by Order in Council 514/1975 under the authority of the Public Service Administrative Transfers Act. Creation of the department was formalized by the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Amendment Act (S.A. 1975, c. 7), on June 25 that same year. The Department was dissolved in 1983 through the passage and proclamation of the Department of Advanced Education Act (S.A. 1983, c. D–11.1) and the Department of Manpower Act (S.A. 1983, c. D–24.5).

Alberta. Advisory Board of Examiners (Chiropractic)

  • Corporate body
  • 1923-1945

The Advisory Board of Examiners was established in 1923 by the Chiropractic Act (S.A. 1923, c. 58, s. 4). Its role was to examine applications for individuals seeking to register as a chiropractor to ensure whether or not the applicant met the qualifications set out in the Act. The Advisory Board disbanded when its enabling legislation was repealed by a new Chiropractic Act (S.A. 1945, c. 16), which transferred the function to an Examining Board within the Alberta Chiropractic Association.

Alberta. Advisory Board on Objectionable Publications

  • Corporate body
  • 1954-1976

The Advisory Board on Objectionable Publications was created on December 29, 1954 by Order-in-Council (O.C) 1801/54 through Section 3 of the Cultural Development Act (S.A. 1946, c. 9). The Advisory Board does not appear to have met after the appointments of its board members expired in 1973, and it was disbanded on November 2, 1976 by O.C. 1194/76.

Names of Chief Officers:
Chair of the Advisory Board on Objectionable Publications
Anna P. Maure, 1954-1960
Tom Jackson, 1960-1963
D.V. Steele, 1963-1965
J.M. Godfrey, 1965-1966
J.D. Palmer, 1966-1968
Aleta Vikse, 1969-1971
J.G. MacGregor, 1971-1973

Alberta. Advisory Committee on Weather Modification

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1987

The Advisory Committee on Weather Modification was established in 1980. The committee advised the Minister on the weather modification research program operated by the Alberta Research Council. The committee disbanded in 1987 after the five year research program concluded.

Alberta Advisory Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-1972

The Alberta Advisory Council was established on October 18, 1967 (O.C. 1971/67). First proposed in the March 1967 "A White Paper on Human Resources Development," the Council provided advice on the social and economic needs of the province as well as recommendations on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of government programs and services. The Council had an Economic Division charged with studying physical resources development as well as a Social Division responsible for evaluating human resources development. The Council was disbanded on March 31, 1972.

Alberta Agricultural Centennial Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1969

In 1965 the Farmers' Union and Co-operative Development Association proposed the formation of a committee to organize centennial projects for the agricultural community. In response to the proposal, the Alberta Federation of Agriculture established the Alberta Agricultural Centennial Committee. The Committee incorporated under the Societies Act on May 16, 1966 and operated in Edmonton, Alberta.

Objectives of the Committee included creating centennial projects for Alberta farmers and organizations. In pursuit of their objectives, the Committee promoted and organized farm beautification and highways projects. In addition, the Committee also contributed items to the Agriculture Hall of Fame. The Committee also sponsored publications related to the history of agriculture in Alberta, constructed a monument to farm pioneers in Red Deer, produced the film We Just Take it All for Granted, and sponsored a trip to Expo 67 (Montreal, Canada)

The Committee dissolved in 1969.

Alberta. Agricultural Development Corporation

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-1993

The Agricultural Development Act incorporated the Alberta Agricultural Development Corporation on June 2, 1972 (S.A. 1972, c. 5). The corporation was in operation until 1993. The Agriculture Financial Services Act (S.A. 1993, c. A-12.5) formally repealed the Agricultural Development Act on March 31, 1994.

Alberta. Agricultural Products Marketing Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Alberta Agricultural Products Marketing Council was established on April 12, 1965 in An Act to Amend the Marketing of Agricultural Products Act (S.A. 1965, c. 51). The role of the Council is provide for the promotion, control, and regulation in any or all aspects of the marketing of agricultural products within the province.

Alberta Agricultural Research Institute

  • Corporate body
  • 1987-1999

The Alberta Agricultural Research Institute was incorporated on July 15, 1987, under the Alberta Agricultural Research Institute Act (S.A. 1987, c.A-13.7) and dissolved in 2000.

Alberta Agricultural Research Trust

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-1987

The Alberta Agricultural Research Trust began in 1966 and was officially incorporated in the enabling legislation, the Alberta Agriculture Research Trust Act (S.A. 1970, c. 4), on April 15, 1970. The enabling legislation was repealed in 1987, and the corporation was dissolved. The role of the Trust was to fund applied and fundamental agricultural research.

Alberta. Agriculture. 4-H Branch (1953-1959)

  • Corporate body
  • 1953-1959

The 4-H Branch was established in 1953. In 1959, its programs became part of the Schools of Agriculture and Vocational Schools Branch.

Alberta. Agriculture. 4-H Branch (1976-1992)

  • Corporate body
  • 1976-1992

The 4-H Branch was formed in 1976 when the program area was transferred back to the Ministry of Agriculture. The program area has been in the Department of Recreation, Parks and Wildlife for one year (1975-76) and previously a part of the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Recreation. The branch was transferred to the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development in 1992.

Alberta. Agriculture. Administration and Statistics (Dairy)

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1984

The Administration and Statistics Branch of the Dairy Division was established in 1980. Although the Division continued to collect and report statistics, the Branch itself was disbanded in 1984.

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