Enoch Cree Nation

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Scope note(s)

  • Enoch Cree Nation is also known as Maskêkosihk, which translates to "people of the land of medicine."

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      Hierarchical terms

      Enoch Cree Nation

        Equivalent terms

        Enoch Cree Nation

          Associated terms

          Enoch Cree Nation

            14 Archival description results for Enoch Cree Nation

            14 results directly related Exclude narrower terms
            Alex Miller fonds
            PR0129 · Fonds · 1979-1981

            The fonds consists of video records of Rellim Productions and has been divided into the following series: “Fliers Pioneering Canadian Aviation” records, “Jazz Unlimited” records, “Air Shows in Western Canada” records, and “Enoch Indian Days (Stony Indian Reserve)” records [of Enoch Cree Nation].

            Miller, Alex
            Alexis Morin interview
            PR1968.0019-3 · File · November 28, 1966
            Part of Spruce Grove Oral Histories fonds

            This is a recording of an interview conducted by Violet Peacock with Alexis Morin. The interview is in Cree and in it Morin discusses his own life history and life on the Enoch Reserve.

            Edmonton band membership lists for the following bands: Alexis, Alexander, Enoch and Paul [Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation, Alexander First Nation, Enoch Cree Nation, and Paul First Nation]. Also includes single page for ‘General List’, identifying three members of ‘Band 50’. Lists include family name and number, given names of individuals in the family, and the date of birth, sex and religion of individuals in the family.

            File · 1970 (Creation)
            Part of Mapping and Surveying - Indigenous Resource Guide

            This accession contains records from Alberta Municipal Affairs and is comprised of maps of reserves.

            File GR1971.0074/1 was commissioned by the Alberta Provincial Planning Branch. This black and white map illustrates the geographic location of Blood Indian Reserves #148 and 148a [Kainai First Nation], Pigeon Lake Reserve #138a and Stony Plain Reserve #135. All are located in the Edmonton-Hobbema district. In particular, it shows the location of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Highway 2, Battle River, nearby town sites, and various smaller rivers, lakes and streams. Its dimensions are 37x25” (1970)

            File GR1971.0074/2 was commissioned by the Alberta Provincial Planning Branch. This black and white map illustrates the geographic location of the Peigan Indian Reserves #147 and 147b. Both are located in the Blood-Peigan district. The map depicts the location of the nearby town sites, and various smaller rivers, lakes and streams. Its dimensions are 37x25” (1970).

            File GR1971.0074/3 was commissioned by the Alberta Provincial Planning Branch. This black and white map illustrates the geographic location of Blackfoot Indian Reserve #146. It is located in the Blackfoot/Stony/Sarcee district. The map depicts the location of the nearby town sites, and various smaller rivers, lakes and streams. Its dimensions are 37x25” (1970).

            File GR1971.0074/6 was commissioned by the Alberta Provincial Planning Branch. This black and white map illustrates the Enoch, Samson [Enoch Cree Nation], Ermineskin [Ermineskin Cree Nation], Louis Bull and [Montana First Nation] Montana Indian Reserves #135, 137, 137a, 138, 138b and 139. They are located in the [Edmonton-Maskwacis] Edmonton-Hobbema district. The map depicts the location of the nearby town sites, and smaller rivers, lakes and streams. Its dimensions are 37x25” (1970).

            File GR1971.0074/7 was commissioned by the Alberta Provincial Planning Branch. This black and white map illustrates the [Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation, Alexander First Nation, and Paul First Nation] Alexis, Alexander, and Paul Reserves #133, (Wabamun Lake) 133a, 133b, 133c, and 134. They are located in the Edmonton-Hobbema district. The map depicts the location of Lac Ste. Anne, Lake Wabamun, Highway 16, the Canadian Pacific Railway, nearby town sites, and smaller rivers, lakes and streams. Its dimensions are 37x25” (1970).

            PR1974.0156/39 · File · [195-?]
            Part of Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI), Lacombe Canada fonds

            Recordings of Canticles, sermons, choral songs, gospels, masses, commandments, stories, Christmas songs, baptisms, weddings, and traditional songs in various Indigenous languages including Cree (predominant), Inuit languages (unspecified), Salteaux, and Montangnais. Includes recordings from Sacred Heart and Joussard (St. Bruno's) School. Also includes recordings from Blue Quills St. Paul.

            PR4007 · Collection · [Before 1983]

            The collection consists of research files related to the former Papaschase Indian Reserve. The collection includes photocopies of correspondence, reports, orders in council, and other related records. The copied records cover the years 1881-1975

            The Papaschase Band [Papaschase First Nation] signed to join Treaty 6 in 1877, but no action was taken by the Federal Government until 1880 to survey a reserve for the band. Due to a government error in the number of band members the surveyed reserve was smaller than should have been allotted. The Indian Agent responsible for the band transferred some members out when a complaint about this error was brought up, and the later commissioner pressured the band to surrender their land near Edmonton after years of pressure from Edmonton-area settlers. Band members were transferred mostly to the [Enoch Cree Nation] Enoch Band, and the land of Indian Reserve 136 was sold off. Band members were also convinced to relinquish Treaty Status through the North West Half-breed Commission, having been informed they would still retain title to their land. As of 2019, there were two separate groups representing descendants of the original Band. As of 2020, the Papaschase First Nation contended that Canada has acted contrary to the terms of the surrender.

            The collection contains student reports on the Papaschase Reservation, and these are accompanied by documents such as copies of land titles, land patent applications, memorandum of scrip applications and deeds, Treaty 6, and surrender documents. There are also maps, correspondence on land title status and sales, records of those receiving scrip and having been discharged from treaty, interview records for scrip applications, and correspondence on uses of the “abandoned” Papaschase Reserve.

            In addition, many of the folders contain indexes of sales, correspondence, and Library and Archives Canada records. There are also copies of relevant newspaper articles, handwritten notes and timelines, legal decisions, and the Métis Betterment Act.

            The collection also contains a map depicting how the Papaschase Reserve fit into quarter sections. This map is a “plan of the subdivision into sections of the lands reserved for the band of Chief Papaschase.” It has been marked with pencil and pen along several edges. This map was first printed in Ottawa in 1891, and follows the reserve’s re-survey in 1890.